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" The various modes of worship which prevailed in the Roman world were all considered by the people as equally true; by the philosopher as equally false; and by the magistrate as equally useful. "
A view of the evidences of Christianity - Page 33
by William Paley - 1811
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Evolution and Human Values

Robert Wesson, Robert G. Wesson, Patricia A. Williams - Philosophy - 1995 - 251 pages
...tranquility. According to Gibbon, for example: "The various modes of worship which prevailed in the ancient world were all considered by the people as equally...true; by the philosophers as equally false; and by the magistrates as equally useful" (quoted in Harrington 1983, p. 26). Or according to Napoleon, on the...
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The Enlightenment: An Interpretation. The science of freedom

Peter Gay - History - 1996 - 705 pages
...the reflections of the enlightened, and by the habits of the superstitious, part of their subjects. The various modes of worship which prevailed in the...all considered by the people as equally true, by the philosopher as equally false, and by the magistrates as equally useful."8 It seemed an interesting...
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Modern American Religion, Volume 3: Under God, Indivisible, 1941-1960

Martin E. Marty - History - 1986 - 555 pages
...which the great historian Edward Gibbon had seen in the age of the Antonines in Rome. Gibbon wrote: "The various modes of worship which prevailed in the...all considered by the people as equally true; by the philosopher as equally false; and by the magistrate as equally useful. And thus toleration produced...
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The Diegesis

Robert Taylor - 1997 - 448 pages
...resistance to the only faithful and rational account of the matter, so elegantly given us by Gibbon. t *•' The various modes of worship which prevailed in the...Roman world, were all considered, by the people, as equal iy true, — by the philosopher, as equally false, — and b\ the magistrate, as equally useful....
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A Jewish Understanding of the World

John D. Rayner - Religion - 1998 - 196 pages
...religions ceased to be taken seriously, for as Gibbon wrote in his Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire: 'The various modes of worship, which prevailed in...equally false; and by the magistrate, as equally useful' (Ch. 2). This, above all, is why the Roman Empire declined and fell. Its rulers and citizens in the...
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The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire: 28 Selected Chapters

Edward Gibbon - Fiction - 1998 - 1089 pages
...the reflections of the enlightened, and by the habits of the superstitious, part of their subjects. The various modes of worship which prevailed in the...all considered by the people as equally true; by the philosopher as equally false; and by the magistrate as equally useful. And thus toleration produced...
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The Wordsworth Dictionary of Quotations

Connie Robertson - Reference - 1998 - 669 pages
...manina. Your tiny hand is frozen. GIBBON Edward 1737-1794 390 1 The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire ' a philosopher, as equally false; and by the magistrate, as equally useful. And thus toleration produced...
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The Argument of Psellos' Chronographia

Anthony Kaldellēs - History - 1999 - 223 pages
...1.1.19 and 1.1.20. 249 Cf. Edward Gibbon, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, \. 1, pp. 25-26: "The various modes of worship, which prevailed in...considered by the people, as equally true; by the philosopher, as equally false; and by the magistrate, as equally useful." Note that philosophers and...
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New Technologies and Reference Services, Part 4

Bill Katz, Linda S. Katz - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2000 - 149 pages
...from Sir Edward Gibbon (1737-1794), the author of The Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire. Gibbon said: The various modes of worship which prevailed in the...all considered by the people as equally true; by the philosopher as equally false; and by the magistrate as equally useful. We may now call magistrates...
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Social Science Quotations: Who Said What, When, and Where

David L. Sills, Robert King Merton - Social Science - 2000 - 437 pages
...the reflections of the enlightened, and by the habits of the superstitious, part of their subjects. The various modes of worship which prevailed in the...all considered by the people as equally true; by the philosopher as equally false; and by the magistrate as equally useful. And thus toleration produced...
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