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" The various modes of worship which prevailed in the Roman world were all considered by the people as equally true; by the philosopher as equally false; and by the magistrate as equally useful. "
A view of the evidences of Christianity - Page 33
by William Paley - 1811
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Constantine and the Bishops: The Politics of Intolerance

H. A. Drake - Biography & Autobiography - 2002 - 609 pages
...intransigence. He set the tone early, remarking during a survey of conditions in the second century that "the various modes of worship which prevailed in the...all considered by the people as equally true; by the philosopher as equally false; and by the magistrate as equally useful." Later, he applied this premise...
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Retos de la razón práctica

José Manuel Bermudo Avila, Montse Lavado Fau - 2002 - 585 pages
...by the reflections ofthe enlightened, and by the habits ofthe superstitious, part oftheir subjects. The various modes of worship, which prevailed in the...considered by the people, as equally true; by the philosopher, as equallyfalse; and by the magistrate. as equally useful. And thus toleration produced...
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The Omphalos and the Cross: Pagans and Christians in Search of a Divine Center

Paul Ciholas - Religion - 2003 - 513 pages
...the reflections of the enlightened, and by the habits of the superstitious, part of their subjects. The various modes of worship, which prevailed in the...all considered by the people as equally true; by the philosopher, as equally false; and by the magistrate, as equally useful. And thus toleration produced...
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The Enlightenment: A Sourcebook and Reader

Paul Hyland, Olga Gomez, Francesca Greensides - History - 2003 - 467 pages
...the reflections of the enlightened, and by the habits of the superstitious, part of their subjects. The various modes of worship which prevailed in the...all considered by the people as equally true; by the philosopher as equally false; and by the magistrate as equally useful. And thus toleration produced...
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The Scientific & the Divine: Conflict and Reconciliation from Ancient Greece ...

James A. Arieti, Patrick A. Wilson - Philosophy - 2003 - 334 pages
...therefore no principled way of preferring one to another. Gibbon, referring to Roman religion, writes, "The various modes of worship, which prevailed in...considered by the people, as equally true; by the philosopher, as equally false; and by the magistrate, as equally useful."22 The impossibility of logically...
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How We Believe, 2nd Edition: Science, Skepticism, and the Search for God

Michael Shermer - Psychology - 2003 - 330 pages
...Fall of the Roman Empire, Edward Gibbon concluded his discussion of religion with this observation: "The various modes of worship which prevailed in the...all considered by the people as equally true; by the philosopher as equally false; and by the magistrate as equally useful." As we have seen, belief in...
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The Heart Of Conflict: A Spirituality of Transformation

Dr. Elinor Powell - 288 pages
...further suffering and injustices as a result. RELIGIOUS INSTITUTIONS & THEIR RELATION TO THE STATE The various modes of worship which prevailed in the Roman world were all considered... by the magistrate to be as equally useful. Edward Gibbon Religious institutions the world over have worked...
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The Enlightenment: A Sourcebook and Reader

Paul Hyland, Olga Gomez, Francesca Greensides - History - 2003 - 467 pages
...the reflections of the enlightened, and hv the hahits of the superstitious, part of their suhjects. The various modes of worship which prevailed in the Roman world were all considered hy the people as equally true; hy the philosopher as equallv talse; and hy the magistrate as equallv...
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From Babel to Dragomans: Interpreting the Middle East

Bernard Lewis - History - 2004 - 456 pages
...different from that of the pagan Roman Empire, so vividly described by Edward Gibbon when he remarked that "the various modes of worship, which prevailed in...considered by the people, as equally true; by the philosopher, as equally false; and by the magistrate, as equally useful." Islam was never prepared,...
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Truth: A Guide

Simon Blackburn - Philosophy - 2005 - 272 pages
...good at distinguishing weeds from flowers. Perhaps our situation is like that of Rome as described by Gibbon: 'The various modes of worship, which prevailed...considered by the people, as equally true; by the philosopher, as equally false; and by the magistrate as equally useful.'1 But is it really the cranky,...
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