the cambridge history of the british empire, Volume 1

Front Cover
CUP Archive, 1981
 

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Contents

CHAPTER I
1
The Cordillera
7
Relations of the Aborigines to the Settlers
13
Early French Explorations
19
Champlain on the St Lawrence
25
Champlain returns to Canada
31
The Council of Quebec
37
The Iroquois Menace
43
Origin of Difficulties with the French
423
Representative Government
429
The Riots of 18601861
435
Union advocated in the Provinces
441
I COMMUNICATIONS
443
The Civil War in the United States
447
The Charlottetown Conference
453
Delay in the Maritime Provinces
459

Unpropitious Beginnings
49
The Liquor Traffic
55
The Lachine Massacre
59
The Canadian Parish
65
Finance and Currency
71
The End of New France
77
Peace of Ryswick
83
The First Capture of Louisbourg
89
Fort Necessity
95
The Fall of Fort William Henry
101
Wolfe reaches Quebec
107
The Battle on the Heights of Abraham
113
CHAPTER V
119
Rival Interests
125
Abortive Schemes for Colonisation
127
Suggested Removal of the Colonists
133
Beginnings of Organised Government
139
Annexation of Labrador
145
The Military Regime and the English Minority
151
The Tribulations of Governor Murray
157
The Necessity for a new Constitution
163
Legislature
169
Conditions in Quebec
175
Arnolds Retreat from Canada
181
The Treaty of Peace and the Loyalists
187
The Government and the Loyalists
193
Significance of the Act
199
Dorchester and the War with France
203
Party Conflict at Quebec
209
Developments in New Brunswick
215
Maritime Rights
221
Brock in Upper Canada
227
The Restoration of Peace
233
Public Finance a Constitutional Issue
239
Rejection of the Howick Act of 1831
245
B UPPER CANADA 18151837
251
Problems of Communication
257
Gourlay and the Beginnings of Reform
263
The Rebellion of 1837 and its Sequel
269
Moderation and Harmony
275
Howe and the Issue in Nova Scotia
281
CHAPTER XI
287
Durhams Achievements
293
Durhams Defence
299
Fox and Colonial SelfGovernment
305
Charles Poulett Thomson Lord Sydenham
311
The Crisis of September 1842
317
End of the First Union Parliament
321
Discontents in 1849
327
CHAPTER XIII
333
Prosperity and its Reckoning
339
Constitutional Solutions
345
Reformers in Office
351
Responsible Government in Nova Scotia
357
Reciprocity and its Effects
363
CHAPTER XV
369
Support by British Banking Firms
375
Competition of American Routes
381
Reciprocity with the United States
387
Denunciation of the Treaty
393
La Verendryes Explorations
397
Overland to the Western Sea
403
Rival Western FurTraders
409
Beginnings of the Prairie Provinces
417
Early Canadian Interest in the West
465
Negotiating the Transfer of the North West
471
ects Union
477
The Election of 1872 43
483
Defeat of Mackenzie 409
489
The Canadian Pacific Railway
495
Laurier as Liberal Leader
501
The Thompson and Bowell Governments
507
Laurier as Prime Minister
513
The Reciprocity Agreement
519
CHAPTER XXII
521
NonBritish Settlements
527
The Early Problems of Manitoba
533
The Gain of Respons1ble Government
539
The Growth of Law and Order
545
The Esquimalt Graving Dock
551
The Martin Government
557
The Oriental Problem
563
By W T Jackman M A Professor of Economics
568
Sea Dogs of the Maritimes
569
The Beginnings of Manitoba
575
Development of Highways
581
Canal Projects
587
The Government takes over the Grand Trunk
593
Crop Improvement
599
Fruit and Vegetables
605
Manufactures
611
Progress in Mining
617
Water Power Consolidation of Firms
623
Banking Problems
629
The Relapse in and after 1912
635
Population and Banking Sales
641
The Depression of the Seventies
647
The British Preferential Tariff
653
The Geographical Background
659
Mining
665
The Struggle against adverse Conditions
671
The Commercial Crisis of 1894
677
The Toll and Burden of War
683
Initiative and Referendum
689
The Judicial System
695
Provincial Executive Power
701
The Imperial Council
707
Imperial Communications
713
The South African War
719
Canadas Relation to Foreign Powers
725
Representation at the Peace Conference
731
Durability of Autonomous Rights
737
Parliament faces the War
743
MidWar Problems
749
Canadas Hundred Days
755
CHAPTER XXXII
756
The Unionist Government
759
Canadas Relations to the Empire
765
CHAPTER XXXIII
771
French National Sentiment
777
Regionalism Early Education
783
Beginnings of Higher Education
789
Schools in Upper Canada
795
Work and Influence of the Schools
801
Literature and the Fine Arts since Confederation
807
Bibliography
813
Index
887

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