The Critique of Pure Modernity: Hegel, Heidegger, and After

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University of Chicago Press, 1986 - History - 316 pages
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"Modernity" is a troubling concept, not only for scholars but for the general public, for it seems to represent a choice between oppressive traditions and empty, rootless freedom. Seeking a broader understanding of modernity, Kolb first considers the views of Weber and then discusses in detail the pivotal writings of Hegel and Heidegger. He uses the novel strategy of presenting Heidegger's critique of Hegel and then suggesting the critique of Heidegger that Hegel might have made.

Kolb offers his own views, proposing the possibility of a meaningful life that is free but still rooted in shared contexts. He concludes with comments on "postmodernity" as discussed by Lyotard and others, arguing persuasively against the presupposition of a unified Modern or Postmodern Age.

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Contents

The Modern World
1
Hegels Criticisms of Civil Society
20
Hegels Logic and Its Movements
38
Categories for Modernity
57
Applying Hegels Logic
77
Civil Society and State
96
Heidegger and the Modern World
118
Putting Modernity in Its Place
151
Life in the Modern World
178
Hegel versus Heidegger
201
Further Explorations
237
The Modern World Revisited
256
Notes
271
Bibliography
293
Index
309
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About the author (1986)

David Kolb is the Charles A. Dana Professor of Philosophy at Bates College and the author of Postmodern Sophistications: Philosophy, Architecture, and Tradition, also published by the University of Chicago Press.

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