Personal Narrative of a Pilgrimage to El-Madinah and Meccah

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G. P. Putnam & Company, 1856 - Arabian Peninsula - 492 pages
 

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Contents

I
17
II
29
III
41
IV
48
V
73
VI
86
VII
94
VIII
107
XVIII
257
XIX
273
XX
290
XXI
304
XXII
318
XXIII
345
XXIV
366
XXV
389

IX
120
X
135
XI
145
XII
155
XIII
167
XIV
179
XV
194
XVI
230
XVII
243
XXVI
401
XXVII
413
XXVIII
423
XXIX
432
XXX
446
XXXI
453
XXXII
469
XXXIII
479

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Page 427 - So every spirit, as it is most pure, And hath in it the more of heavenly light, So it the fairer body doth procure To habit in, and it more fairly dight, With cheerful grace and amiable sight. For, of the soul, the body form doth take, For soul is form, and doth the body make.
Page 311 - ... is good sense defaced: Some are bewilder'd in the maze of schools, And some made coxcombs Nature meant but fools. In search of wit these lose their common sense, And then turn critics...
Page 372 - Its colour is now a deep reddish brown, approaching to black: it is surrounded on all sides by a border, composed of a substance which I took to be a close cement of pitch and gravel, of a similar, but not quite the same brownish colour.
Page 435 - In the name of Allah, and Allah is Almighty ! (I do this) in hatred of the fiend and to his shame.
Page 37 - A dagger,13 a brass inkstand and pen-holder stuck in the belt, and a mighty rosary, which on occasion might have been converted into a weapon of offence, completed my equipment. I must not omit to mention the proper method of carrying money, which in these lands should never be entrusted to box or bag. A common cotton purse secured in a breast pocket (for Egypt now abounds in that...
Page 99 - ... or the pricking of a camel's hoof, would be a certain death of torture— a haggard land, infested with wild beasts, and wilder men— a region whose very fountains murmur the warning words, "Drink and away!
Page 326 - ... husband provides separate apartments and a distinct establishment for each of his wives, unless, as sometimes happens, one be an old woman and the other a child. And, confessing that envy, hatred, and malice often flourish in polygamy, the Moslem asks, Is monogamy open to no objections? As far as my limited observations go, polyandry is the only state of society in which jealousy and quarrels about the sex are the exception and not the rule of life.
Page 309 - Arabs, were mounted on dromedaries, and the soldiers had horses : a led animal was saddled for every grandee, ready whenever he might wish to leave his litter. Women, children, and invalids of the poorer classes sat upon a
Page 390 - I may truly say that, of all the worshippers who clung weeping to the curtain, or who pressed their beating hearts to the stone, none felt for the moment a deeper emotion than did the Haji from the far north.
Page 375 - AH 981, by order of the sultan, and describes an irregular oval ; it is surrounded by thirty-two slender gilt pillars, or rather poles, between every two of which are suspended seven glass lamps, always lighted after sunset.* Beyond the poles is a second pavement, about eight paces broad, somewhat elevated above the first, but of coarser work ; then another six inches higher, and eighteen paces broad, upon which stand several small buildings; beyond this is the gravelled ground; so that two broad...

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