The Meaning of Prayer

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Cosimo, Inc., Nov 1, 2005 - Religion - 212 pages
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Harry Emerson Fosdick was one of the most popular liberal preachers of the early twentieth century, and his The Meaning of Prayer is considered by many one of the finest studies of the meditative communion with God. This lovely little book features daily devotional readings focused on understanding prayer, reflecting upon: .The Naturalness of Prayer .Prayer and the Goodness of God .Hindrances and Difficulties .Unanswered Prayer .Prayer as Dominant Desire .Unselfishness in Prayer and other issues arising from conversing with the divine. This warm, friendly guidebook to a profoundly personal act remains an important exploration of one of the world's dominant faiths... just as it was when it was first published in 1915. Also available from Cosimo Classics: Fosdick's The Manhood of the Master and The Meaning of Faith. American theologian HARRY EMERSON FOSDICK (1878-1969) was born in New York, educated at Colgate and Columbia Universities, and served as professor of practical theology at Union Theological Seminary from 1915 to 1946. Among his many works are A Guide to Understanding the Bible (1938) and A Book of Public Prayers (1960).

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Contents

The Naturalness of Prayer
1
Prayer as Communion with God
20
Gods Care for the In dividual
39
Prayer and the Goodness of God
55
Hindrances and Difficulties
71
Prayer and the Reign of Law
92
Unanswered Prayer
113
Prayer as Dominant Desire
133
Prayer as a Battlefield
152
Unselfishness in Prayer
172
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Page 133 - If I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am become sounding brass, or a clanging cymbal.
Page 5 - They mount up to the heaven, they go down again to the depths: their soul is melted because of trouble. They reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man, and are at their wit's end.
Page 147 - Prayer is the burden of a sigh, The falling of a tear, The upward glancing of an eye When none but God is near.
Page 114 - How precious also are thy thoughts unto me, O God ! how great is the sum of them. If I should count them, they are more in number than the sand: when I awake, I am still with thee.
Page 80 - I looked to Heaven, and tried to pray; But or ever a prayer had gusht, A wicked whisper came, and made My heart as dry as dust.
Page 180 - Ye have heard that it hath been said, Thou shalt love thy neighbor, and hate thine enemy. But I say unto you, Love your enemies, and pray for them that persecute you; That ye may be sons of your Father who is in heaven: for he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust.
Page 57 - And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward.
Page 27 - And it came to pass, that, as he was praying in a certain place, when he ceased, one of his disciples said unto him, Lord, teach us to pray, as John also taught his disciples.
Page 24 - And when he came to himself, he said, How many hired servants of my father's have bread enough and to spare, and I perish with hunger...
Page 65 - I will not cease from Mental Fight, Nor shall my Sword sleep in my hand Till we have built Jerusalem In England's green and pleasant Land.

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