Trauma and Self

Front Cover
Charles B. Strozier, Michael Flynn
Rowman & Littlefield, 1996 - Psychology - 303 pages
This remarkable collection of original essays, written by prominent scholars recognized for their achievements in a wide range of disciplines, defines trauma as a disruption in the fragile process of symbolization, or the human capacity to imbue life with meaning by representing the self's immortality. The contributors analyze the multiple meanings and deeper significance of trauma, whether of shell-shocked war veterans or victims of sexual abuse, and they discuss its manifestations, both subtle and obvious, in human behavior and memory. Organized as an honorary volume to Robert Jay Lifton, who identified trauma as the core psychological issue of the postmodern world, this book demonstrates how trauma and other fundamental breaks in human continuity inform psychiatric, historical, religious, literary, political, cultural, and scientific interpretations of the self.
 

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Contents

IV
3
V
19
VI
29
VII
45
VIII
57
IX
59
X
69
XI
81
XX
175
XXI
185
XXII
197
XXIII
205
XXIV
221
XXV
231
XXVI
245
XXVII
255

XII
95
XIII
99
XIV
119
XV
129
XVII
131
XVIII
151
XIX
159
XXVIII
267
XXIX
279
XXX
287
XXXI
297
XXXII
301
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About the author (1996)

Charles B. Strozier is Professor of History at John Jay College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York, where he is also Co-director of the Center on Violence and Human Survival.

Michael Flynn is Lecturer of Psychology at York College, the City University of New York, and Associate Director of the Center on Violence and Human Survival.

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