Handbook of Research on Socio-Technical Design and Social Networking Systems

Front Cover
Whitworth, Brian, de Moor, Aldo
IGI Global, Mar 31, 2009 - Computers - 1034 pages

The focus of this book is not how to make technology more efficient, nor even how technology harms or helps society, but rather how to successfully combine society and technology into socio-technical performance.

The Handbook of Research on Socio-Technical Design and Social Networking Systems provides a state-of-the-art summary of knowledge in this evolving, multi-disciplinary field distinctive in its variety of international authors' perspectives, depth and breadth of scholarship, and combination of practical and theoretical views. This noteworthy Handbook of Research extends a useful collection for anyone interested in modern socio-technical systems where knowledge of social principles can mean the difference between success and failure.

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Contents

General SocioTechnical Theory
1
The Social Requirements of Technical Systems
3
The Social Study of Computer Science
23
Virtual Collaboration and Community
39
The Social Derivation of Technical Systems
50
SocioTechnical Theory and Work Systems in the Information Age
65
An Engagement Strategy for Community Network Research and Design
78
On the Alignment of Organizational and Software Structure
94
A Modern SocioTechnical View on ERPSystems
429
A State of Mind or Technological Design?
440
Applying Bourdieu to eBays Success and SocioTechnical Design
455
Relationships and Etiquette with Technical Systems
473
SocioTechnical Implementation
489
Augmenting Actual Life Through MUVEs
493
The Role of Affect in an AgentBased Collaborative ELearning System Used for Engineering Education
510
GazeAided HumanComputer and HumanHuman Dialogue
529

SocioTechnical Perspectives
106
Privacy and the Identity Gap in SocioTechnical Systems
110
Privacy Regulation in the Metaverse
123
Leadership of Integrated Teams in Virtual Environments
137
Recontextualising Technology in Appropriation Processes
153
Explaining Participation in Online Communities
167
Cyber Security and AntiSocial Networking
183
Emerging Cybercrime Variants in the SocioTechnical Space
195
Developing Innovative Practice in Service Industries
209
SocioTechnical Analysis
222
Using Communication Norms in SocioTechnical Systems
224
SocioInstrumental Pragmatism in Action
236
A Framework for Using Analytics to Make Decisions
251
The Challenges of CoDesign and the Case of eMe
265
Formal Analysis of Workflows in Software Development
280
The Role of Expectations in Information Systems Development
298
Building a Path for Future Communities
313
SocioTechnical Design
334
Systems Design with the SocioTechnical Walkthrough
336
Applied Pragmatism and Interaction Design
352
A Social Framework for Software Architectural Design
367
Designing for Trust
388
Pattern languages for CMC Design
402
Creating Social Technologies to Assist and Understand Social Interactions
416
How to Engage Users in Online Sociability
544
SocioTechnical Systems and Knowledge Representation
558
Social Support for Online Learning
575
Enabling Remote Participation in Research
589
SocioTechnical Evaluation
605
Community Collective Efficacy
608
An Analysis of the SocioTechnical Gap in Social Networking Sites
620
Situational Awareness in Collaborative Work Environments
636
A Scale of Affective Satisfaction in Online Learning Communities
651
Assessing the Social Network Health of Virtual Communities
669
Situated Evaluation of SocioTechnical Systems
685
Cultural Appropriation of Software Design and Evaluation
699
The Future of SocioTechnical Systems
712
Resolving Wicked Problems through Collaboration
715
The Myth of the ECommerce Serf to Sovereign Powershift
731
Teaching the SocioTechnical Practices of Tomorrow Today
748
From Informal to Formal?
763
Future Living in a Participatory Way
779
The Impact of Communications Technology on Trust
794
Good and Evil in the Garden of Emerging Information Technologies
805
Compilation of References
820
About the Contributors
899
Index
918
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About the author (2009)

Brian Whitworth is a senior lecturer at Massey University (Albany) (Auckland, New Zealand). He holds a BSc in mathematics, a BA in psychology, an MA (1st Class) in neuro-psychology, and a PhD in information systems. He has published in journals like Small Group Research, Group Decision & Negotiation, The Database for Advances in Information Systems, Communications of the AIS, IEEE Computer, Behavior and Information Technology (BIT), Communications of the ACM and IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man and Cybernetics. Topics include generating online agreement, voting before discussing, online communication processes, legitimate by design, spam and the social-technical gap, polite computing and the web of system performance. His hobbies include motorcycle riding, quantum theory, and philosophical songs.

Aldo de Moor is owner of CommunitySense, a research consultancy firm on community informatics. In 1999, he got his PhD in information management from Tilburg University (Netherlands). From 1999-2004, he was an assistant professor at Infolab, Department of Information Systems and Management, Tilburg University. In 2005-2006, he was a senior researcher at the Semantics Technology and Applications Research Laboratory (STARLab) of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. Aldo?s research interests include the evolution of virtual communities, communicative workflow modeling, argumentation support technologies, language/action theory, conceptual graph theory, and socio-technical systems design. Aldo has been a visiting researcher at the University of Guelph (Canada) and the University of Technology (Sydney, Australia). Aldo has been Program Co-Chair of the International Conference on Conceptual Structures, the Language/Action Perspective Working Conference on Communication Modeling, and the Pragmatic Web Conference. Key publications have appeared in journals like Communications of the ACM, Data and Knowledge Engineering, Group Decision and Negotiation, Information Systems, Information Systems Frontiers, and Information Systems Journal. [Editor]

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