Lincoln's Wrath: Fierce Mobs, Brilliant Scoundrels and a President's Mission to Destroy the Press

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Sourcebooks, Inc., Nov 1, 2006 - History - 368 pages
In the blistering summer of 1861, President Lincoln began pressuring and ordering the physical shutdown of any Northern newspaper that voiced opposition to the war. These attacks were sometimes carried out by soldiers, sometimes by angry mobs under cover of darkness. Either way, the effect was a complete dismantling of the free press.

In the midst stood publisher John Hodgson, an angry bigot so hated that a local newspaper gleefully reported his defeat in a bar fight. He was also firmly against Lincoln and the war--an opinion he expressed loudly through his newspaper.

When his press was destroyed, first by a mob, then by U.S. Marshals "upon authority of the President of the United States," Hodgson decided to take on the entire United States. Thus began a trial in which one small-town publisher risked imprisonment or worse, and the future of free speech hung in the balance.

Based on 10 years of original research, Lincoln's Wrath brings to life one of the most gripping, dramatic and unknown stories of U.S. history.
 

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LINCOLN'S WRATH: Fierce Mobs, Brilliant Scoundrels and a President's Mission to Destroy the Press

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That Abe Lincoln. First he crushes states' rights, then suspends the writ of habeas corpus. Next thing you know, he'll want to demolish the First Amendment.The subtitle of Manber and Dahlstrom's ... Read full review

Contents

A True Account of the United States of Ameria vs the Jeffersonian Newspaper
193
Epilogue
299
the Full Text of Judge Lowries Charge to the Jury
309
About the Authors
317
Bibliography
319
Notes
333
Index
351
Back Cover
359
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Neil Dahlstrom is a noted historian and scholar and has written on many topics of nineteenth-century America, including the Civil War. He lives in Moline, Illinois.

Jeffrey Manber has published more than 50 articles in publications such as the New York Times and has been interviewed on CNN and other networks. He lives in Alexandria, Virginia.

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