Essays and Lectures on the Industrial Development of India, and Other Indian Subjects (1880-1906)

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W. Newman, 1906 - Caste - 288 pages
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Page 247 - The white people had now found our country. Tidings were carried back and more came amongst us. Yet, we did not fear them. We took them to be friends. They called us brothers. We believed them and gave them a larger seat. At length, their numbers had greatly increased. They wanted more land; they wanted our country. Our eyes were opened and our minds became uneasy.
Page 247 - But an evil day came upon us. Your forefathers crossed the great water and landed on this island. Their numbers were small. They found friends and not enemies. • They told us they had fled from their own country for fear of wicked men, and had come here to enjoy their religion. They asked for a small seat.
Page 147 - We can only say, folly is an illness for which there is na medicine, and the Hindus believe that there is no country but theirs, no nation like theirs, no kings like theirs, no religion like theirs, no science like theirs.
Page 238 - It is a condition in which the food, warmth, and clothing, which are necessary for the mere maintenance of the functions of the body in their normal state, cannot be obtained ; in which men, women, and children are forced to crowd into dens wherein decency is abolished, and the most ordinary conditions of healthful existence are impossible of attainment ; in which the pleasures within reach are reduced to...
Page 147 - ... the Hindus believe that there is no country but theirs, no nation like theirs, no kings like theirs, no religion like theirs, no science like theirs. They are haughty, foolishly vain, selfconceited, and stolid. They are by nature niggardly in communicating that which they know, and they take the greatest possible care to withhold it from men of another caste among their own people, still much more, of course, from any foreigner.
Page 157 - Musalman on the Ramazan. Who formed the remaining months and days, that you should venerate but one ? If the Creator dwell in tabernacles, whose dwelling is the universe...
Page 237 - I do not think there is any exact English equivalent. It is a condition in which the food, warmth and clothing which are necessary for the mere maintenance of the functions of the body in their normal state cannot be obtained ; in which men, women and children are forced to crowd into dens wherein decency is abolished and the most ordinary conditions of healthful existence are impossible of attainment ; in which the pleasures within reach are reduced to bestiality and drunkenness; in...
Page 183 - Jehan reigned not so much as a King over his subjects, but rather as a father over his family and children.
Page 141 - Mahmud utterly ruined the prosperity of the country and performed there wonderful exploits, by which the Hindus became like atoms of dust scattered in all directions and like a tale of old in the mouth of the people.
Page 247 - Brother, our seats were once large, and yours were very small ; you have now become a great people, and we have scarcely a place left to spread our blankets; you have got our country, but are not satisfied; you want to force your religion upon us.

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