Royal United Service Institution Journal, Volume 18

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W. Mitchell and Son, 1875 - Military art and science
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Page 293 - With professed pirates there is no state of peace. They are the enemies of every country, and at all times ; and therefore are universally subject to the extreme rights of war.
Page 526 - Cumberland," a coloured English print of the end of the last century or the beginning of this, after, I think, Loutherbourg, and in several rooms there were English engravings after Martin. The English will not, I think, regret if they yield to these attractions.
Page 102 - For commanding troops he was said to be qualified in as great a degree as was consistent with his temper ; for he was excelled by no one in ability to contrive how an army might have provisions, and to procure them ; and he was equally fitted to impress on all around him the necessity of obeying Clearchus.
Page 296 - British interests ; and that it should be pointed out to them, that if an attack is made at sea upon any foreign vessel by a ship belonging to no recognized national Government who can be made responsible for such act, such attack is piracy ; but that as regards an attack by a ship in possession of insurgents against their own domestic Government, upon the ships of that Government at sea, or upon its cities, ports, or people, within the territorial limits of their own nation, such attack is not piracy...
Page x - That the thanks of this Meeting be given to the Members of the Council who retire by rotation...
Page xxiv - TELEGRAPH AND TRAVEL. A Narrative of the Formation and Development of Telegraphic Communication between England and India, under the orders of Her Majesty's government, with incidental Notices of the Countries traversed by the Lines. By Colonel Sir FREDERIC GOLDSMID, CB, KCSI, late Director of the Government Indo-European Telegraph.
Page 310 - The ultimate result being the same, any charcoal may be used at first. The process is carried out without odour, from the closets to the finished products. Of course the process may be modified; for instance, suppose the char to be used five times, and only dried, the addition to its value would be as follows (I take equal parts, as this charcoal will absorb at least an equal weight of even urine) : — i ton seaweed char, at 2} = 30 cwts.
Page 293 - Pirates being the common enemies of all mankind, and all nations having an equal interest in their apprehension and punishment, they may be lawfully captured on the high seas by the armed vessels of any particular state, and brought within its territorial jurisdiction for trial in its tribunals.
Page 310 - When convenient it is re-burned, like the char in sugar refineries, except that this process is carried out in apparatus which admits of collecting the ammonia and other products condensed. The whole of the ammonia is thus collected ; whilst the phosphoric acid, potash and mineral matters accumulate in the charcoal, together with the carbon from the organic constituents of the excreta. The weight of the charcoal is increased to the extent of about 5 per cent, with each using, and if dried and re-used...
Page 310 - ... condensed. The whole of the ammonia is thus collected ; whilst the phosphoric acid, potash, and mineral matters accumulate in the charcoal, together with the carbon from the organic constituents of the excreta. The weight of the charcoal is increased to the extent of about 5 per cent, with each using, and, if dried and re-used five times, about 25 per cent, with each re-burning. With this constant addition, the char does not require replacing with fresh material...

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