Road Engineering for Development, Second Edition

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CRC Press, Jun 3, 2004 - Technology & Engineering - 544 pages
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Developing countries in the tropics have different natural conditions and different institutional and financial situations to industrialized countries. However, most textbooks on highway engineering are based on experience from industrialized countries with temperate climates, and deal only with specific problems.
Road Engineering for Development (published as Highway and Traffic Engineering in Developing Countries in its first edition) provides a comprehensive description of the planning, design, construction and maintenance of roads in developing countries. It covers a wide range of technical and non-technical problems that may confront road engineers working in this area. The technical content of the book has been fully updated and current development issues are focused on.
Designed as a fundamental text for civil engineering students this book also offers a broad, practical view of the subject for practising engineers. It has been written with the assistance of a number of world-renowned specialist professional engineers with many years experience in Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Central America.
 

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Contents

Roads and development
3
12 Evolution of development theory
6
13 Poverty
10
14 Evolution of road development
13
15 Impact of roads on economic development
14
16 Transport and poverty
15
17 Impact of roads on the transition to a market economy
20
References
21
132 Pavement structure
251
133 Unbound pavement layers
253
134 Design of gravel pavements
256
135 Stabilized pavement layers
257
References
263
Asphalt pavement materials
264
143 Surface dressing
268
144 Premixed asphalt
273

Policy
23
22 Government policy
24
23 Organizational policy
26
24 Integrated policy
28
25 Dissemination
31
27 Policy formulation
33
28 Policy issues
36
References
37
Traffic
38
33 Traffic flows and growth
42
34 Capacity and speedflow
43
35 Increasing capacity
50
36 Traffic information and data
51
References
56
Traffic safety
57
43 Road accident costs
59
44 Contributory factors
62
45 Institutions and information systems
64
46 Improving road safety
65
47 Priorities for action
75
References
76
Roads and the environment
78
53 Environmental impact assessment
86
54 Concluding remarks
90
References
91
Planning methods
92
62 Strategic planning
93
63 Physical network planning
95
64 Transport demand forecasting
98
65 Plan development and implementation
106
66 Planning for rural transport infrastructure
110
References
112
Economic appraisal
114
73 Cost estimation
117
74 Assessment of benefits for major roads
119
75 Costbenefit analysis for major roads
122
76 Minor road appraisal
127
References
132
Design
135
Soil investigation
137
82 Evaluation of existing information
138
83 Field investigation
144
84 Laboratory testing
147
85 Soil classification
157
References
161
Tropical soils and rocks
162
92 Rocks
163
93 Soils
165
References
177
Hydrology and drainage
178
102 Rainfall
179
103 Flood discharge estimation
183
104 Hydraulic design
188
105 Longitudinal drainage components
190
106 Cross drainage components
193
107 Culvert design
196
108 Erosion and scour protection
199
References
204
Geometric design controls
205
112 Approach to selecting design standards
207
113 Classification of roads
208
114 Sight distance
211
115 Traffic
215
References
223
Geometric alignment design
224
122 Horizontal alignment
225
123 Vertical alignment
229
124 Phasing
234
125 Alignment selection
235
126 Intersections
239
127 Lowcost roads
241
128 Computeraided design
242
References
243
Earthworks unbound and stabilized pavements
244
References
283
Structural design of asphalt pavements
284
152 Basic empirical methods
285
153 Overseas Road Note 31
286
154 The AASHTO method
289
155 Theoreticalmechanistic design
295
156 Overlay design
302
References
304
Construction
307
Contracts and works procurement
309
162 Types of contract
313
163 The FIDIC contract
316
References
323
Contract supervision
325
173 Quality control
329
174 Measurement of work
332
175 Payment to the contractor
333
176 Progress control
336
177 Extension of time
337
178 Cost claims
338
179 Default of contractor
341
1710 Supervision procedures
342
References
344
Appropriate technology
345
183 Intermediate methods
352
184 Equipment management
364
References
367
Maintenance
369
Maintenance management
371
193 Network information
374
194 Assessing needs
376
195 Determining options
381
196 Choosing actions
383
197 Implementation
386
198 Monitoring and audit
389
199 Information systems
390
References
392
Maintenance operations
393
203 Safety
394
204 Asphalt pavements
395
205 Unpaved roads
402
206 Roadside areas
407
207 Drainage systems
409
208 Traffic control devices
414
References
415
The HDM4 road investment model
416
212 Types of analysis
417
213 Structure of HDM4
420
214 Components of HDM4
423
215 Examples of applications
431
References
437
Institutional issues
439
Institutional development
441
222 Finance
443
223 Management
450
224 Ownership and responsibility
457
225 Expected outcomes
458
Training of staff
460
232 Institutional issues
462
233 Training types
463
234 Training needs analysis
466
235 Planning
468
236 Detailed preparation
475
237 Implementation
479
References
482
Development aid
483
243 International aid agencies
487
244 Bilateral donors
489
245 Assistance to the transport and road sector
490
246 Recent trends in aid management
491
247 Project cycle and framework
494
References
500
Index
502
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Page xxiii - Objective type questions have also been given at the end of each chapter. Every effort has been made to provide a good continuity and present the various topics with the greatest possible clarity.

About the author (2004)

Dr Richard Robinson is an independent consultant and has an honorary appointment at the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom. He spent over 20 years at the Transport Research Laboratory, and recently held the Senior Roads Specialist position at the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. He has worked in 40 countries and has published over 100 papers and articles.

Professor Bent Thagesen is the former Professor of Highway Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark. He has worked as a highway engineer in Africa and in Asia, and has carried out research at the Danish Road Research Laboratory. He has been a consultant to the World Bank, the United Nations and various development organizations and firms concerned with roads in the developing world. He edited the first edition of this book, Highway and Traffic Engineering in Developing Countries.

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