Programming Language Concepts

Front Cover
Wiley, Feb 23, 1987 - Computers - 428 pages
The revision of a popular, text/reference guide analyzes and evaluates the important concepts found in current programming languages based on how the language supports software development. Revisions include a consideration of more languages, new chapters on declarative programming and formal semantics, expanded coverage of object oriented programming and operational semantics, a more thorough discussion of programming environments, as well as more examples, explanations, and exercises. Improves the reader's ability to appreciate and evaluate programming languages. Identifies the important concepts in programming languages and reviews their strengths and limitations.

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User Review  - dick_pountain - LibraryThing

By some way the most readable and interesting summary I've come across. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - dick_pountain - LibraryThing

By some way the most readable and interesting summary I've come across. Read full review

Contents

Introdi
1
Evolution of Concepts
19
Suggestions for Further Reading and Bibliographic Notes
38
Q2J Language Processing
50
Suggestions for Further Reading and Bibliographic Notes
92
Abstract Data Types
143
5
170
Suggestions for Further Reading and Bibliographic Notes
219
Suggestions for Further Reading and Bibliographic Notes
288
Suggestions for Further Reading and Bibliographic Notes
312
Suggestions for Further Reading and Bibliographic Notes
331
Exercises
347
APL
353
Concurrent Pascal
359
Gypsy
363
Index
406

Suggestions for Further Reading and Bibliographic Notes
255
Copyright

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About the author (1987)

Carlo Ghezzi" is a professor of computer science at the Politecnico di Milano, where he holds the chair of software engineering. He was named a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery in 2000 for his contributions to software engineering research.

"Mehdi Jazayeri" is a professor of computer science at the Technische Universitš t Wien, where he holds the chair of distributed systems. He spent many years in software development at several Silicon Valley companies, including 10 years at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, Palo Alto, CA.

"Dino Mandrioli" is a professor of computer science at the Politecnico di Milano, where he holds the chair of theoretical computer science. His research interests are centered on the application of formal methods in the practice of software engineering.

Bibliographic information