Computer graphics: using OpenGL

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Pearson Prentice Hall, 2007 - Computers - 778 pages
Updated throughout for the latest developments and technologies, this book combines the principles and major techniques in computer graphics with state-of-the-art examples.Updates treatment of graphics hardware and algorithms. Discusses the development of video games through history. Emphasizes interactive graphics more strongly than in previous editions. Relates examples to things readers see everyday on the Internet and in computer-generated movies. Carefully presents each concept, explains the underlying mathematics, shows how to translate the math into program code, and displays the result.A thorough, useful reference for anyone interested in computer graphics.

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Contents

Introduction to Computer Graphics
1
for Raster Images
21
Initial Steps in Drawing Figures
39

15 other sections not shown

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About the author (2007)

F.S. Hill Jr. is a Professor Emeritus of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.  He received a Ph. D. degree from Yale University in 1968, worked for 3 years in digital data transmission at Bell Telephone Laboratories, and joined the University in 1970.  He is the author of numerous articles in the field of signal processing, communications, and computer graphics.  He has been editor and associate editor of the IEEE Communications Society magazine.  He is also a fellow of the IEEE.  He is co-author of the book Introduction To Engineering and has won several awards for outstanding teaching.

 

Stephen M. Kelley and Dr. Hill met in 2000 in connection with a National Science Foundation distance learning project.  Since then co-teaching courses in computer graphics at the University of Massachusetts and co-authoring Computer Graphics using OpenGL, 3rd Edition.  Stephen Kelley recently graduated from the University of Massachusetts with a degree in Interactive Multimedia and Computer Graphics along with a minor in Information Technology.  Stephen also runs his own web development and consulting company, Intangible Inc.

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