Connecting Histories in Afghanistan: Market Relations and State Formation on a Colonial Frontier (Google eBook)

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Stanford University Press, Feb 11, 2011 - History - 288 pages
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Most histories of nineteenth-century Afghanistan argue that the country remained immune to the colonialism emanating from British India because, militarily, Afghan defenders were successful in keeping out British imperial invaders. However, despite these military victories, colonial influences still made their way into Afghanistan. Looking closely at commerce in and between Kabul, Peshawar, and Qandahar, this book reveals how local Afghan nomads and Indian bankers responded to state policies on trade.

British colonial political emphasis on Kabul had significant commercial consequences both for the city itself and for the cities it displaced to become the capital of the emerging Afghan state. Focused on routing between three key markets, Connecting Histories in Afghanistan challenges the overtly political tone and Orientalist bias that characterize classic colonialism and much contemporary discussion of Afghanistan.
  

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Contents

Part II The New Outdated Colonial Political Economy
95
Deflecting Colonial Canons and CannonsAlternate Routes to Knowing Afghanistan
165
Commercial Vocabulary in NineteenthCentury Afghanistan
177
Abbreviations Transliterations and Spellings
183
Notes
185
Sources and Notes for Maps and Figures
239
Bibliography
243
Index
257
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About the author (2011)

Shah Mahmoud Hanifi is Associate Professor of History at James Madison University.

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